‘Aboriginal Sensitivity Censors’

I really advocate that publishers just not publish non-Native writers [writing Native stories] until the reading public of the U.S. and Canada has a firm understanding of ‘indigenous’ histories“…”

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

A sensitivity reader is a ‘cultural consultant’, who goes through a manuscript and looks for issues of bias, ‘charged language’ and stereotyping“,
said Mi’kmaq sensitivity reader Tiffany Morris…

“…Morris reads — on average — two manuscripts per month. Morris said she is often approached to read manuscripts focused on Mi’kmaq history, and more broadly, ‘indigenous’ stories or stories that include ‘indigenous’ characters.

Some things that I flag that could be of concern include instances of possible stereotyping…”

“One person using the internet to change how ‘indigenous’ people are portrayed in literature is Debbie Reese… Reese said that stereotypes of ‘indigenous’ people are still prominent today in popular children’s books.

One of the most beloved books in the United States is “Clifford the Big Red Dog” and in “Clifford’s Halloween”, one of the options that is considered for his Halloween costume is that he might be an Indian {Oh! Heaven forbid!},
said Reese.

On that page, he’s shown in a large, feathered headdress … he’s got a pipe in his mouth with a feather hanging from it, and the normal happy-go-lucky Clifford has this stern face, [with] a big frown.”

“Reese said that these stereotypes will continue unless there are dramatic changes in the publishing industry.

I really advocate that publishers just not publish non-Native writers [writing Native stories] … until the reading public of the U.S. and Canada has a firm understanding of … ‘indigenous’ histories“,
said Reese.

{Such astounding arrogance…and such incredible ignorance when it comes to things like Freedom of Speech…}

–‘Sensitivity readers spot racism, stereotypes before books are published’,
CBC Radio, April 15, 2018

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/sensitivity-readers-spot-racism-stereotypes-before-books-are-published-1.4618796
♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠
“The books, “Who Took My Sister?” by Shannon Webb-Campbell and “In Case I Go” by Angie Abdou, have both sparked conversations of who should be telling ‘indigenous’ stories, and when to ask for permission {?}…”

–‘Consultation, permission and Indigenous protocol’,
CBC Radio, April 15, 2018

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/who-gets-to-tell-indigenous-stories-1.4616308/longread-consultation-permission-and-indigenous-protocol-1.4616581

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/who-gets-to-tell-indigenous-stories-1.4616308

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠
#ENDRACEBASEDLAWCANADA

Websites:
END RACE BASED LAW inc. Canada
https://endracebasedlaw.wordpress.com/

ERBL Canada Daily News Feed Blog
https://endracebasedlawcanadanews.wordpress.com/
♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠
TWITTER:
FEATURED STORIES (follow us)
https://twitter.com/endracebasedlaw
@ENDRACEBASEDLAW

ERBL Canada News Feed
https://twitter.com/ERBLcanadanews
@ERBLcanadanews

ONE NATION ONE LAW CANADA
https://twitter.com/1NATION1LAW
@1NATION1LAW
♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠
Facebook:
ERBL Main Page
https://www.facebook.com/ENDRACEBASEDLAW

ERBL Canada Daily News Feed Blog
https://www.facebook.com/ENDRACEBASEDLAWCANADANEWS/

ONE NATION ONE LAW CANADA
https://www.facebook.com/ONENATIONONELAWCANADA

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠
Petition to END RACE BASED LAW
https://endracebasedlaw.wordpress.com/petition-canada/

Mail to: endracebasedlawpetition@gmail.com

JOIN US IN THE FUTURE OF A UNIFIED CANADA

Advertisements

Thank you from ERBL inc. Canada

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s